Tag: poetry

Stoehr-Monjou ‘How to Conclude?’

Annick Stoehr-Monjou, ‘How to conclude? A poetics of contrast and paradox in Book 9 and especially in Epist. 9,13-16 by Sidonius Apollinaris’, is a paper given at the International conference and workshop ‘The Stumbling Texts (and Stumbling Readers) of Late Latin Poetry (Lector, quas patieris hic salebras!)’, organised by Markus Kersten, Ann-Kathrin Stähle and Christian Guerra, September 2021, Basel.

Stoehr-Monjou argues that the last four letters of book 9 can be read together as the peroration of his epistolary work, a paradoxical peroration since he writes about poetry.

In HAL Archives (first version).

Stumbling Texts to Start

Lector, quas patieris hic salebras!
The Stumbling Texts (and Stumbling Readers) of Late Latin Poetry

Basel, 30th Sept. – 2nd Oct. 2021,
organised by Ann-Kathrin Stähle, Markus Kersten, Christian Guerra, Henriette Harich-Schwarzbauer

Further information can be found here: https://latinistik.philhist.unibas.ch/de/aktuelles/veranstaltungen/details/lector/

Those interested in participating (online) are asked to contact alex.giannotta@unibas.ch

PROGRAMME:

Christiane Reitz (Rostock/Berlin): Reading – what and why? Some reflections on progress, deterioration and evaluation of ancient literature

Claudia Schindler (Hamburg): Quoting quotations: Multi-layer intertextuality in late antique poetry

Aaron Pelttari (Edinburgh): Chapters, Headings, and Tables of Contents in Later Latin Literature

Luciana Furbetta (Trieste): Legere and/or tegere? Reflections on a ‘key question’ for the Late Antique Author and his Readers

Joshua Hartmann (Brunswick, ME): Memory and the Purpose of Poetry in Late Antique Paratexts

Andreas Abele (Tübingen): Elaboratam soloci filo accipe cantilenam. The ‘Preface’ of Symmachus’ Letter Collection

Annick Stoehr-Monjou (Clermont): How to conclude? A poetics of contrast and paradox in Sid. Epist. IX,13-16

Scott McGill (Houston, TX): Revising Rewriting: Eudocia, the Cento, and Distributed Authorship

Jesús Hernández Lobato (Salamanca): Adstipulatio veri: Language and Reality in Ennodius of Pavia

Etienne Wolff (Paris): Le discours d’Ausone sur son œuvre

Florence Garambois-Vasquez (St. Etienne): Les lettres préfacielles d’Ausone, paratexte paradigme ou paratexte parasite?

Brian P. Sowers (Brooklyn, NY): Everyone’s a Critic: Ausonius on His Coterie and Its Etiquette

Claire Pryor (Sydney): Intertextuality, metapoetics, and the development of an “ascetic sublime” in Paulinus of Nola’s Letters to Ausonius and Amandus

Christopher Poms (Graz): Quas rudi latinitate compositas elegis sum explicare conatus: The disparaging assessments, topical modesty, and ‘awkward’ intertextuality in Avianus

Adrien Bresson (Lyon): Claudian’s Carmina minora: a collection of short pieces by a stumbling poet?

Raphael Schwitter (Bonn): The politics of rusticitas in late antique hagiography

Enno Friedrich (Graz/Erfurt): Venantius Fortunatus’s vecors otium in his letter to Bishop Syagrius

Elena Castelnuovo (Milano): De modicis minimus: Venantius Fortunatus and the value of his Life of Saint Martin

Doctorate Lucie Desbrosses

Lucie Desbrosses has got her doctorate at the University of Besançon (supervisor Stéphane Ratti). The title of her thesis is: ‘Sidoine Apollinaire et la Gaule chrétienne au Ve siècle’.

Abstract: ‘This dissertation investigates how Sidonius Apollinaris’ poetry and letters shed light on the Christian identity of Gaul in Late Antiquity, and how the author takes part in defining it. It focuses on Christian reactions to traditional culture and the “pagan” background in particular, paying special attention to claims of renunciation and to actual comprises with past patterns. It first of all paints a picture of fifth-century Christianity in Gaul, studying how, and how deeply, the religio nova had penetrated the Gallic provinces, pointing out the remains of heterodox and “pagan” beliefs. It also examines the cultural (dis)continuity in the individual transition from lay status to conversio and clerical status, for which Sidonius, belonging to the lay social élite, and then to the clerical sphere, is a key figure. It pays special attention to writing poetry to enhance Christian identity, but also to express one’s nostalgic attachment to the ancient world, its literature, its culture, and its past pleasures.’

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